Services & Fees

  1. Initial intakes, the review of your claim as set forth in the website intake questionnaire (hard copies can be faxed), are free of charge. Upon review, you will be contacted within 36 hours of receipt to establish a date and time for consultation, for further review and discussion. All consultations are $450 due at the time of the consultation meeting. If the Firm offers to handle the case, a proposed retainer will be provided at the close of the consultation meeting.
  2. A retainer agreement is required upon your retention of the Firm's services. Legal advice will not be provided until the retainer agreement is executed. The Firm's billing rates vary upon the nature of the work.
  3. Billing rates are available upon request.
  4. In the instance of litigation, a retainer deposit is required to cover court costs, discovery expense, and costs associated with all motion practice. Such amounts will be deposited in the Firm's client trust account, as required, and dispersed in accordance with the terms of the retainer agreement.
  5. The Firm will take contingency fee cases in certain matters. A listing of such matters is available on request.
  6. A monthly statement of services detailing work performed and the time associated with all activities will be provided to you at the close of each month. Fees are due and owing within 20 days. If your retainer deposit is exhausted, a new deposit will be required so that it may be billed against as services and expenses are incurred.
  7. Remember that there are very short time frames for enforcing many employment and employee benefit claims. Therefore, always remember that time is off the essence when determining whether and how you wish to enforce your rights and protect your interests.
  8. For your convenience, the Firm accepts Visa and MasterCard.

Contact Us

Clark Law Group, PLLC
1100 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Suite 920
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: (202) 293-0015
Fax: (202) 293-0115
Google+

Clark Weekly

Clark Weekly

Topic of the Week

Health & Safety - How does the law protect you at work

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) publishes rules and enforces the Occupational Safety and Health Act (also OSHA), which protect workers from on-the-job injuries and illness.

Read more...

Blog of the Week

Why the NCAA Should Pay Student-Athletes—And Let Them Unionize

When college sports revenues are as high as they’ve ever been, the failure to pay the athletes is absurd—but not surprising.

Thought for the Week

"Whistleblowers like those being awarded today may be the source of ‘smoking gun’ evidence and indispensable assistance that strengthens the agency’s ability to protect investors and the capital markets."

–Jane Norberg, chief of the SEC’s whistleblower office on a whistleblowing case at JP Morgan

List of the Week

from Workplace Fairness

Top Searches in Health & Safety this week: 

  • Smoking rights in the workplace
  • Workers compensation: What to do 
  • Workplace health and safety protections
  • Infectious diseases in the workplace

 

Top Five News Headlines

  1. Want to be a whistleblower? Read this first
  2. Stop & Shop workers’ strike enters fifth day
  3. Employee privacy in the US is at stake as corporate surveillance technology monitors workers’ every move
  4. McDonald’s retreat on fighting wage increases shows the tide is turning
  5. A key labor moment arrives at the University of Pittsburgh. Will grad assistants vote to join a union?